The Island of Dr. Moreau.

Marlon Brando and David Thewlis engage in a mostly courteous exchange of ideas, and find said ideas to be at loggerheads. Various snouts, hooves, and outrageous spectacles are discussed. From The Island of Dr. Moreau, 1996. Both actors are at the pinnacle of their craft.

π‘‡β„Žπ‘’ π‘€π‘œπ‘Ÿπ‘–π‘Žπ‘Ÿπ‘‘π‘¦ {π΄π‘›π‘‘π‘Ÿπ‘’π‘€ π‘†π‘π‘œπ‘‘𝑑}.

Actor Andrew Scott turns in a bravura performance as criminal mastermind James Moriarty in the BBC series Sherlock. Truly mesmerizing.

π‘―π’Šπ’•π’„π’‰π’„π’π’„π’Œ’𝒔 π‘·π’”π’šπ’„π’‰π’ {1960}.

The reaction/mood of Norman Bates {portrayed iconically by Anthony Perkins} changes rather drastically, from chipper, to utterly incredulous, to overtly hostile, to a resigned world-weariness, to a last attempt at chipperness, when Janet Leigh’s character suggests, out of concern for Norman, that his mother be put in “…some…place…”

When the dogged, unswerving Milton Arbogast {Martin Balsam} calmly dissembles the slowly dissolving structural integrity of Norman’s version of events, he opts to do nothing less than trot out the heavy artillery, proclaiming “If it doesn’t gel, it isn’t aspic; and this ain’t gelling.” Stunned silence proceeds to take over the entire universe.

π‘‡β„Žπ‘’π‘ π‘’ πΉπ‘Ÿπ‘Žπ‘”π‘šπ‘’π‘›π‘‘π‘  𝐼 π»π‘Žπ‘£π‘’ π‘†β„Žπ‘œπ‘Ÿπ‘’𝑑…

These Fragments I Have Shored Against My Ruins…

Adieu…

Hieronymo’s Mad Againe…

Paul Bettany displays simply towering talent in his portrayal here of serial killer Ted Kaczynski. Such examples of the following phenomenon are not without precedent, but they are rare fowl indeed. The Phenomenon: Bettany manages to be more Unabomber-esque than the Unabomber himself. Sure, it’s not possible; but this seems to pose little hindrance. Like G. Oldman as Stansfield, Olivier as Christian Szell, and Brando as Lee Clayton, Bettany simply has that much power to spare. It is rare indeed that a performance can truly be categorized as iconic…but the word applies fully in this situation. Incredible mastery. I find it haunting, in any number of ways, to this day. Indelible.

*And* herein lies the most….well, the most any-number-of-Things…iteration of “Huh.” Ever.

Psychopathic Types IV

Ian Holm I

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Some fine work here by some of our best. First, Ian Holm does Jack The Ripper. Mr. Holm, not usually known for this type of thing, “kills” it. Amazing creativity. Then my guy Tom Noonan plays John Lee Roche, a towering psychopath who is soft-spoken but quite hilarious: nothing could beat “You’re just resisting me.” for a bit of dialogue with such a type. Next, career “Hey! It’s THAT guy!” actor…..which means you’re doing something RIGHT….Mark Holton allows John Gacy to inhabit him utterly in Crawl Space (2003). Very cool, very deadpan….then, in a (for me) surprise of sorts, Brian Dennehy pulls a devastating gem from his arsenal in his *own* portrayal of The Killer Clown in 1992’s To Catch a Killer. This is the only scene in the TV-movie with any violence, really,Β  of any kind….and here it’s 100% psychological (which, if you’ve been there….)….but/and Dennehy’s undeniably intense psychopathic trance is unforgettable, poignant, tragic.Β  And plenty frightening. Whoa.

π‘‡β„Žπ‘’ πΆβ„Žπ‘Ÿπ‘–π‘ π‘‘π‘œπ‘β„Ž π‘Šπ‘Žπ‘™π‘‘π‘§.

{Note: Revised 7/22/2019}

The great Christoph Waltz, Two-Time Academy Award winner, shows some of his inimitable what-have-you.

Ravenous.

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Brilliant actor Robert Carlyle, and the extremely weird, uneasy cult masterpiece Ravenous (1999). Directed by Antonia Bird.