The Led Zeppelin.

Led Zeppelin, with four scintillating live performances. Page, Plant, Bonham and Jones are all in top form. JPJ even has his moments, esp. No Quarter. Plant, as always, is as powerful, beguiling, and inventive a lead vocalist as any that exists on this planet, and both Page and Bonham demonstrate why they are legends.

π½π‘–π‘šπ‘– π»π‘’π‘›π‘‘π‘Ÿπ‘–π‘₯.

Jimi Hendrix, whether performing the somber, doleful Hey Joe, the furiously kinetic Johnny B. Goode, or the iconic, brain-imploding National anthem, was a virtuoso on his instrument unlike any other.

Hand of the Poet: Jarvis Cocker.

A Sheffield lad, Pulp’s Jarvis Branson Cocker remains a titan and figurehead of the British music world. The “Erotic Coathanger”‘s quirky, enigmatic ways make him a source of immense curiosity to millions. Then, there are his hands, the antics of which are unprecedented in the annals of such things.

Paul Weller and The Jam.

The angry, but smartly suited, young men of The Jam, featuring vocalist and “Modfather Paul Weller, combined briskly tempoed rock with Motown R&B to exceptional effect. Weller went on to further fine doings with The Style Council before launching a solo career.

David Bowie.

A modest collection of brilliant live performances by Mr. Bowie, with a wondrous, pared-down demo thrown in for good measure. The constantly reinventing, quasi-androgynous David Robert Jones {his birthname} pioneered his way through the music world, leaving the landscape forever altered—with new worlds and vistas previously undreamt of—in his wake.

The Jazzes.

“Untitled”: Rick Olson; Mark Henderson.
Transition: John Coltrane.
Equinox: John Coltrane
Coltrane/Miles 1960. Bye Bye, Blackbird.
Coltrane w/Miles 1960: All Blues. Amsterdam.
John Coltrane: Spiritual {w/Dolphy}.
1960: All Blues: Miles Davis/John Coltrane Quintet. Stockholm.
Compassion: John Coltrane.
Roland Kirk: No Tonic Pres
Roland Kirk: Rip, Rig, and Panic.
Cecil Taylor: Live in Bologna. 1988
Abdullah Ibrahim: African Dawn.
Pools. Michael Brecker.
Ben Webster: Sunday.
Charlie Parker: Anthropology.
Yusef Lateef: See Line Woman.
Kongsberg: Yusef Lateef.
Mr. Joy: Paul Bley.
Paul Bley: Mr. Joy. from Turning Point. 1975.
Henry Threadgill: I Can’t Wait Till I Get Home.
The Sidewinder: Lee Morgan with Joe Henderson.
Herbie Nichols: The Gig.
Dollar Brand: The Moon.
Dollar Brand: Tintinaya.
Lew Tabackin: Jitterbug Waltz.
Viper’s Drag: Fats Waller.
Julius Hemphill: The Hard Blues.
Albert Ayler: Spirits {from Spiritual Unity}
Just B: Henry Threadgill.

Titans of improvised music display their immense powers.

Pat Martino: The Great Stream.
Valse Hot: Sonny Rollins, Clifford Brown.
Coltrane/Hartman: They Say It’s Wonderful.
Miles Davis: The Leap. Blue Note.
Ray’s Idea: Miles Davis {alt take}.
Lee Morgan {with Jackie McLean}: Miss Nettie B.
Leon Thomas: Song for my Father.
David Murray: Abel’s Blissed Out Blues.
David Murray: Spooning.
Mal Waldron: Blues for FP.
John’s Abbey: Bud Powell.
Julius Hemphill: Dogon A.D.
Herbie Nichols: The Spinning Song.
Go Power: Arnett Cobb, and the great Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis.
Planet Earth: Adderley/Lateef sextet.
Leon Thomas : One.
One For Eric: Jack Dejohnette ensemble, w/David Murray.

World’s Greatest Vocalist: Dwight Yoakam.

Dwight Yoakam can simply do the impossible with his voice. See North to Alaska, among many others, for evidence. He steps into the very large shoes of legend Johnny Horton, and…whoa. A transcendent, jaw-dropping, awe-inducing performance. And, the same can be said of his live 2013 reading of the Red Simpson-penned Close Up The Honky Tonks. Even a young, inexperienced Yoakam—in his 1985 performance above, he shyly asks the audience if they like the show—kills it. A not-many-times-an-epoch talent.

Geldof, Serpents, Etc.

The Boomtown Rats, led by Bob Geldof, perform three of their best, plus a nod to the great Syd Barrett. Geldof might be using a very large python for a microphone, at times. At other times, he strikes a Nixonian pose. On still other occasions, he does neither.

“Sir” Bob {as he is an Irish citizen, he cannot officially/correctly be referred to as “Sir”…} is deeply committed as an activist, particularly to famine relief in Africa.