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Allan Holdsworth Fusion Jazz Miles Davis Music music videos photography

Electric Jazz.

Great moments in so-called Fusion. Miles pretty much invented it, then along came Mahavishnu Orchestra. The latter’s John McLaughlin is a towering instrumentalist, and is featured also in Davis’s Jack Johnson. Belew and Fripp are gods. But perhaps this music’s most brilliant practitioner might be guitarist Allan Holdsworth. A titan of the instrument, revered by Eddie Van Halen, Frank Zappa, and countless others, Holdsworth’s improvisations induce breath-holding and goosebumps.

Addendum: as this post evolves, more will be revealed. Inserting now some Weather Report, featuring Wayne Shorter. And *now*, Jeff Beck.

And furthermore: Pat Martino. And Larry Coryell.

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Charisma Geniuses Guitarists Music music videos

Guitarists, of Note.

The twin titans, Robert Fripp and Adrian Belew, share amusements and dovetail perfectly in these performances.

Then, Terry Kath of Chicago. Hendrix had high praise for this great man.

Well. Hendrix himself.

Mr. John McLaughlin and Co.

The mighty and eternal Allan Holdsworth.

Studio version. Holdsworth godlike simplicity and bearing.
“Fred”.

And, of course, the great Pat Martino.

Sunny.
Strings.

Indeleble performances from giants of the art.

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David Byrne Eno Geniuses hit singles Music music videos new wave performers photography Singers Talking Heads videos vocalists

Talking Heads: The Mad Professor-ism of David Byrne.

Mind. Montreux, 1982.

A few comments on our selections {NOT all of them!!}: Cities {1983, 1982, *and* 1980 versions} *might* be David Byrne’s high-water mark as an “umm, what???” (followed by audible hysteria, in my case…) vocalist. The Impossible writ upon a landscape. Pulled Up and Mind, at the very least, are looking uneasily over their shoulders. The “He’s come undone” staggerings/lurchings in Psycho Killer {1983} are also enough to keep one alive for several epochs; the 1979 Mudd Club version is electrifying, mystique-laden; ridiculously brilliant. Both versions of Drugs have an eerie, haunting element all of their own; Dollette McDonald and Adrian B contribute mightily. Crosseyed is simply a collective singe-fest.